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Goodwin Spends Summer Session in Mexico

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11225807.jpegBy Maria Canales, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - While many of his teammates have spent their summers relaxing, working out or conditioning for the upcoming season, men's hockey junior David Goodwin spent the first half of his summer studying in Mexico. The forward, who notched 15 goals during the 2014-15 campaign, found his niche while taking classes towards his Spanish degree.

Goodwin stayed with a host family, which he said was one of the most appealing parts about choosing this abroad experience.

"I stayed with a Mexican family who was only able to speak Spanish," said Goodwin. "It's a little bit different from other programs where you get to stay in an apartment or a dorm. I really thought that staying with a Spanish speaking family would be the best for me to immerse myself in the culture and in the language."

Although his host family hadn't heard of Penn State hockey before they met Goodwin, they quickly learned about the program. Goodwin taught the family everything they needed to know about the famed Hockey Valley.

11225828.jpeg"I don't think they knew I was on the hockey team, but they definitely figured it out since I wore a lot of Penn State hockey stuff around the house," said Goodwin. "Eventually I was showing them videos of our games and they were just in awe. They thought it was really cool and they're going to try to come up for a game in the next couple years."

Goodwin talked about his favorite cultural aspects of his time abroad. He emphasized that the slower pace of life was what he enjoyed most, especially when it came to bonding with his host family. Mealtimes in Mexico, Goodwin learned, were the cornerstone of family interaction, and the time around a meal is valued as a vital part of a family's relationship.

"After the meals, sitting at the table and just chit chatting in Spanish, in Mexico that's a big cultural thing called 'sobre la mesa' where you stay at the table afterwards for an hour, hour and a half, and just talk with each other," said Goodwin. "That was a great experience for me."

No stranger to living with host families, Goodwin spent his years in junior hockey, before playing for Penn State, staying with host families. Goodwin explained that he felt he had an advantage when it came to getting used to living with a host family, since he had done it many times before.

"I felt like I definitely had a leg up on the other students that were with me because this was probably my fifth time kind of going in to a situation where I was going to be living with a host family who I didn't know before," said Goodwin. "The first few hours and couple days are a bit awkward but I definitely felt I was more comfortable because I had done it so many times prior."


Since his time in Mexico was part of a study abroad experience, Goodwin had the opportunity to take classes and learn more about Mexican heritage and culture. Goodwin took two Spanish classes, one on Mexican literature and another on Mexican history.

"I also took an art class on Mexican art, but that was taught in Spanish so I basically took three Spanish classes," said Goodwin.

11225831.jpegHis time learning and experiencing a new culture didn't confine the All-Big Ten Honorable Mention hockey player to just a classroom. During his final weekend in Mexico, Goodwin and others in his study abroad program traveled to the state of Puebla.

While in Puebla, Goodwin and his fellow students spent a full day at a local school, immersing him further into a culture he had started to become familiar with. This experience resonated with Goodwin in a life-changing way.

"We did some tourist things, but we volunteered at a school for a little over a day," said Goodwin.  "We brought them some food and worked with the kids in the classroom, talked to the kids a lot, and we played a lot of soccer at recess. It was pretty powerful, so I was really happy we did that."

The students at the school taught Goodwin some new soccer tricks, which he believes will come in handy by the time the 2015-16 Penn State men's hockey season rolls around.

"When [my teammates and I] are warming up before the games and we're playing soccer, I'll show them some of my moves I learned in Mexico," said Goodwin.

Goodwin's time in Mexico was a transformative experience, both educationally and personally. Having started out with his own preconceived ideas of the Mexican culture and peoples, Goodwin quickly learned that not everything he had in his head was a proper portrayal of such a wonderful country.

Goodwin explained that the people he met and lived with, along with the beautiful countryside, including mountains and waterfalls, have changed how he will forever look at the country he called home during his summer.

When asked what aspects of the Spanish culture he would bring back to Penn State, Goodwin highlighted that the most important things he learned were about prioritizing time and relationships.

"I think just the awareness of how other people live in the world, experiencing that there's way more to life than the material things, there's way more to life than hockey," said Goodwin. "To see the joys the families had in each other and spending time with each other was something that I felt had been lacking in my life in America, so just bringing back that joy and appreciation for the smaller things in life I think Americans take for granted." 

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VIDEO: 2014-15 Year in Review with Sandy Barbour

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - GoPSUsports.com talks with Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour to review a superb 2014-15 season for Penn State Athletics.





Follow GoPSUsports.com's Tony Mancuso on Twitter @GoPSUTony

VIDEO: 2014-15 Season Highlights

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Penn State's 2014-15 season was one marked by excellence on the field, in the classroom and in the community. GoPSUsports.com takes a look back at the campaign in a season highlight reel.


Commemorating 25 Years of Penn State and the Big Ten

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Penn State has won 92 Big Ten titles, including 21 in women's soccer (16 regular season).



By Tony Mancuso
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Just four months into his tenure as commissioner of the Big Ten Conference, Jim Delany recalls an idea brought to the table by former Illinois President Stan Ikenberry.

It was October of 1989 when Ikenberry, who spent time as a senior administrator at Penn State earlier in his career, broached the thought of adding an institution to the Big Ten for the first time since Michigan State was invited to become a member in 1949.

The Big Ten then began a formal research process of an institution that would bridge a Midwestern league to the East.

The Pennsylvania State University was on the table for discussion as a superb academic institution with a rich tradition in athletic success.

Delany, whose sister attended Penn State as a graduate student, didn't need much convincing. He knew the level of potential a partnership between Penn State and the Big Ten could foster.

"The Big Ten hadn't changed in many, many decades, but I thought if the opportunity to expand presented itself it was a no brainer," Delany said earlier this week. "Excellent academics. Excellent athletics. And pointed towards the East Coast, I thought there was a lot of potential there. That was my recommendation at the time."

The process moved forward with the presidents and chancellors of the Big Ten institutions discussing the topic before news broke just before the holidays in December of 1989 that Penn State could be on its way into a new conference. Under the direction of athletic director Jim Tarman at the time, Penn State had been competing as an independent in football for more than a century, and the rest of the department had been a member of the Atlantic 10 since 1976.

When the news initially surfaced, women's volleyball head coach Russ Rose, who along with field hockey coach Charlene Morett-Curtiss are the two current Penn State head coaches who were on staff in 1989, was giving a presentation at the annual women's volleyball coaches convention (AVCA) about the importance of NCAA Tournament at-large bids for teams in smaller conferences.

"I remember talking in front of the group about the importance that not all of the at-large bids go to the bigger conferences and that there were good teams in other conferences even though they didn't have the same notoriety, said Rose. "We have a lunch break. I turn on ESPN at lunch, and I see that Penn State is going to be a member of the Big Ten. I come back. I say to some people that I would like to retract what I said about at-large teams."

The formal process concluded with a vote in Iowa City on June 4, 1990, at which time Penn State was officially accepted as a member of the Big Ten Conference. Twenty-five years have passed in a partnership that allowed both the University and conference to reach unprecedented heights on the field and in the classroom.

"From a broad perspective, at the time, my view was that it was a tremendous fit for both sides. And history has proven that," Delany said. "With all the other expansions around the country, I'm not sure there was one that benefitted both institution and conference as much as this did, largely because of the characteristics of Penn State were so well matched with the characteristics of the Big Ten."

The positive news zipped throughout campus shortly after the vote in Iowa.

"I remember hearing about the announcement from Mary Jo Haverbeck, from the Sports Information office," said Morett-Curtiss. "She told me about us going in and how it was going to have a major impact for women's athletics at Penn State."

It was an announcement that changed the landscape of funding and development for all of Penn State's 28 programs at the time, and it was a day Morett-Curtiss remembers quite well.

"Ironically, I had gone for a run that day on the trails near Sunset Park and as I'm running, I see someone walking in front of me and it was Joe Paterno," Morett-Curtiss said. "And it was that day, so I said to him, 'hey what's going to happen?' He said, 'I think this is going to be a really good thing for Penn State and the exposure all of the programs are going to get.'"

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The women's volleyball program captured Penn State's first Big Ten title in 1992, marking volleyball's first of 16 conference crowns.

 
Penn State's teams felt the impact of the Big Ten conference almost immediately.

"What it did for us when we joined the Big Ten is that it No. 1 it resulted in a reassessment of the levels of commitment we had to the various programs," Rose said. "We became fully funded when we joined the Big Ten. Prior to that, we were not fully funded. And we were not fully staffed. Entering Big Ten, collectively, for all of the sports resulted in us having a new commitment from the University to try and be competitive. From a volleyball perspective, we had been competitive prior to that, but playing in the Big Ten in women's volleyball made us better because the level of competition was better than we were experiencing in the Atlantic 10."

At the time, women's volleyball had just one assistant coach on the staff alongside Rose and nine scholarships to field a roster. Joining the Big Ten boosted the program to full funding and 12 scholarships.

"As I look at it now, we could have had some great teams if we had funding in the early years," said Rose. "That was just the way that it was.  When you take a job, that is the job you took. When we joined the Big Ten, a lot of us got a better job without having to move. But it's way more competitive. Recruiting is a lot different than what we had experienced in the Atlantic 10."

The same can be said for what Morett-Curtiss experienced within the field hockey program.

"The financial support from a scholarship standpoint was huge right away," said Morett-Curtiss. "And knowing our field that we were going to build was going to be a first rate facility."

The investment for success around the Big Ten stood out during Penn State's transition. Every institution and athletic program strives to be the best. It's a trait that has not changed during the department's 25 years as a member, and it's something that will be a trademark of the Big Ten for decades to come.

"The level of commitment to being good across the conference, everybody cared," said Rose. "I don't believe every conference across the country has that sort of commitment in all of their sports. I think that is one of the things that makes the Big Ten really unique. If they offer it, they care and they want to be relevant."

Penn State's time in the Big Ten has been marked by excellence in the classroom and on the field of play. In all, Penn State's programs have accounted for 92 Big Ten championships from 15 different programs - 76 regular season and 16 post-season. Additionally, more than 170 student-athletes have accounted for nearly 300 individual Big Ten titles.

Penn State student-athletes have earned more than 5,000 Academic All-Big Ten recognitions since it joined the conference, with its three highest totals during the past three years, led by 296 in 2012-13.

"Penn State's entrance into the Big Ten not only changed the intercollegiate sports landscape, it also changed our academic landscape and our future. Our size, our academic reputation and our athletic tradition matched up well with Big Ten schools," said Penn State President Eric Barron, who also noted that all Big Ten schools are flagship universities for their states. "The academic side of the Big Ten is known as the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and the institutions together have annual research expenditures topping $10.2 billion -- more than the Ivy League and the University of California System combined -- and they educate a total of nearly 600,000 students. The benefits from being part of such an outstanding and prestigious organization with such an expansive footprint across the nation are immeasurable."

The women's volleyball program earned Penn State's first Big Ten crown during the 1992 season, just one year after the team began competing in the league. The title marked the first of Penn State's superlative 16 Big Ten titles in women's volleyball, in addition to seven NCAA Championships since 1999.

Like women's volleyball, the women's soccer program has been a benchmark of success in conference play. The program became the department's 29th varsity sport in 1994. Since then, Penn State has won an unprecedented 16 conference titles, including a string of 15-straight from 1998-2012.

The football program claimed the Big Ten title in its second season of competition during an undefeated Rose Bowl championship campaign in 1994. Coach Joe Paterno's '94 squad became the first Big Ten team to ever post a 12-0 record. The '94 crown marked the program's first of three Big Ten championships to date (2005 and 2008).

The fall season of 2005 stands out as a monumental period in Penn State's history within the conference. Nittany Lion teams clinched five Big Ten titles in a span of 30 days. The list included field hockey, football, men's soccer, women's soccer and women's volleyball. Since the fall of 2005, Penn State teams have won 51 Big Ten championships (5.1 titles per year in a 10-year span).

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Penn State clinched five Big Ten titles in a span of 30 days during the fall of 2005, including one for the women's volleyball team.



It's impossible to quantify how the partnership between Penn State and the Big Ten altered the recruiting landscape for the teams on campus and how the recruiting gains equated to success on the field of play. But pitching a world-renowned education with an elite conference affiliation cultivated relationships with premier student-athletes.

"The name recognition was big for football, but when you see how many of the Universities and programs have been successful on a national level, I think that has greatly helped," Morett-Curtiss. "Exposure for all of the Universities within the conference has helped us all grow. Combining the academic side of what these Universities have with the athletics, it's a very powerful combination when we go out recruiting student-athletes."

A big piece to the exposure of Penn State teams during the past 25 years was the launch of the Big Ten Network on Aug. 30, 2007. More than 800 Penn State sporting events have aired live on the BTN since it launched. The benefits of the conference's TV network, which is in more than 60 million homes,  increased visibility across the country for the department in a way that cannot be measured.

"The Network was a major step for us," Morett-Curtiss. "Just having the opportunity to have games on TV so that little girls can watch and learn about the sport. It's helped, not only exposure for the program, but it's helped the sport grow. It's just a phenomenal avenue for us to showcase our University and the sport."

The BTN's impact goes back to what Rose talked about as one of the immediate impacts his program felt - funding. Not only did the BTN infinitely increase exposure for Penn State teams, it has played a paramount role in increased revenues for each institution.

"Certainly, the Big Ten Network has been instrumental in generating funds for the Universities and the conference and the bowl revenue sharing has resulted in more money for all of the schools and the conference," said Rose.

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In 2008, Penn State captured its third Big Ten title in football en route to a trip to the Rose Bowl.

 

While the competitive atmosphere is intense between teams across all of the conference's sports, each member institution understands that the individual success aids in the growth of the collective conference.

"I think the relationship has been a really positive one," said Rose. "There are a lot of similarities between the various Universities."

"Everybody in the Big Ten shares what they do and why they do it; best practices," said Dave Baker, Associate Athletic Director for Business Operations. "We share lots of ideas, at least from the business manager and ticketing perspective. We learn things from one another. And there aren't secrets. We all work together and try to help each other out...We all don't do things the same way. We all have limitations, but we are all looking to help one another out for the betterment of the conference.

"Some people would find it hard to believe that people in the Big Ten root for other Big Ten teams in the postseason, but we do. We follow what is going on...It is a cooperative spirit and a partnership."

Baker is one of just a handful of Penn State administrators and coaches who have been with Intercollegiate Athletics during the past 25 years. That list includes Jan Bortner, who was head coach of the men's tennis team in 1990 and has since transitioned into a role as an associate athletic director. Among the key changes Baker felt from the business operation centered on travel. Bus trips were the norm for Penn State teams in the Atlantic 10, but the geography of the Big Ten led to more plane travel.

A quarter century has passed since initial discussions of a new relationship took place and bonds were formed. Many things have changed significantly for Penn State, the conference and intercollegiate athletics nationwide, but it's been 25 years marked by growth stemming from a vision in 1989.

"Pennsylvania is a very important state. It served as a bridge to the East for us. It made our football offerings stronger," said Delany. "It has been excellence with national championships in a variety of sports. And I have always felt that the 1994 Penn State team was the best team in the country; no disrespect to Nebraska. When you look at the players that team had (five first team All-Americans on offense) and what that group accomplished. That team was the national runner-up. That was a tremendous football team. I've seen some very good basketball teams both on the men's side and the women's side. And obviously, the wrestling and volleyball programs have been dominant on the national scene."

Penn State has won a total of 27 national championships since joining the Big Ten, including three in 2013-14, and the department's collective success speaks for itself.

By no means was the integration in 1990 an easy one, but the partnership between the University and Big Ten is a match that enabled both sides to mutually prosper in a way neither side could have envisioned when the formal vote concluded 25 years ago today.


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The wrestling team began a string of four-straight Big Ten titles in March of 2011.





Follow GoPSUsports.com's Tony Mancuso on Twitter @GoPSUTony

2015 Coaches Caravan Day III - Altoona & Pittsburgh

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Coaches Caravan Registration | Download Your PSU Caravan Photo Booth Pictures Here

Photo Gallery - Altoona | Photo Gallery - Pittsburgh

Day I Recap - Harrisburg & Lancaster | Day II Recap - Washington, D.C. & Baltimore


MARS, Pa. - The first week of the 2015 Coaches Caravan wrapped up in the western half of Pennsylvania on Thursday with a lunch stop in Altoona and an evening reception in northern suburbs of Pittsburgh.

The Penn State Fullington Trailways bus drove nearly three hours to the northwest from Baltimore on Thursday morning in preparation for lunch at Lakemont Park Casino. Take a look through highlights from the final two stops of a six-event leg of the Coaches Caravan.

Stop No. 5 - Altoona (Lakemont Park Casino)
Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour, James Franklin, Guy Gadowsky and Denise St. Pierre headlined the closest stop to the University Park campus on Thursday morning. The ballroom at Lakemont Casino Park hosted the fifth event on the Coaches Caravan before some of the fan base's deepest roots.

Just 45 minutes down the road from State College, Altoona is in the core of Nittany Nation. Fan after fan in the room on Thursday told the coaches and Barbour about either events they had recently attended or games they had circled on their calendars in the fall and winter.

"The heartbeat of Penn State is in Altoona," said Franklin.

One of the big pieces to the fan base in the center portion of the state is the following of the men's hockey program. Gadowsky has mentioned on a number of occasions during his three-day stint on the Caravan about what the growth of youth hockey in Pennsylvania can do for the overall growth of Penn State Hockey.

"Ideally, you want the recruiting footprint to shrink," Gadowsky said. "The more individuals who are involved with youth hockey in the state of Pennsylvania, the better off the entire state will be."

The growth of Nittany Lion hockey, along with the increased interest in youth hockey, tends to go hand in hand. It's a process Gadowsky knows will take time, but it's something he's very excited about. Locations like Altoona are big piece to the puzzle with a growing interest in youth hockey. The region's hockey footprint will grow even further with the announcement that Johnstown (just 50 miles from Altoona) will play host to the NHL's "Hockeyville" game in September.

"I've been so impressed with the interest and reception from the community on the hockey program," said Barbour. "Pegula Ice Arena is a huge piece to that, and the sky is the limit (for the program)."

The Altoona stop marked the final one for St. Pierre. The leader of the women's golf program spent the week educating the fans on the process of being a collegiate golf coach during an extended fall and spring season. She enjoyed the opportunity to interact with the fans and loved to share insight about the program.

"It's been a great ride to hang out with these fantastic people has been a great treat," said St. Pierre. "A lot of people have thanked me for being part of the Caravan, but really it has been my benefit."

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VIDEO: Altoona Press Conference



Stop No. 6 - Pittsburgh (DoubleTree by Hilton in Mars, Pa.)
The Caravan visited a spot near and dear to Coach Franklin en route to the evening reception in Cranberry Township on Thursday. The bus weaved through the Lincoln-Lemington-Belmar section of Pittsburgh (northeast of downtown along the Allegheny River) where Franklin spent a lot of time as a kid. The group met up with childhood friend Keith Gardner (known as "Mighty" from his pickup sports days) near Franklin's Aunt Janet's home on Lemington Ave. The group toured a park where Franklin and "Mighty" played a lot of pickup football and basketball growing up.

"It was really cool. I hadn't been there in probably 30 years," said Franklin. "I come back to Pittsburgh all the time and even did for family functions before Penn State, but to actually go to some of those places today that I haven't been in a long time was really cool."

caravan_pittsburgh_3.jpg The more than 260 attendees inside the Grand Ballroom of the DoubleTree by Hilton in Mars were thrilled to welcome Franklin, Gadowsky and Deputy Director of Athletics & Chief Operating Officer Phil Esten, along with football assistants and Pittsburgh natives Bob Shoop (Oakmont) and Terry M. Smith (Monroeville).

The talk of the room from the fans focused on a number of topics, but there is a general excitement surrounding the hockey program's regular visits to Pittsburgh and the football team's four-year series with Pittsburgh, which begins at Heinz Field on Sept. 10 in 2016. The supporters in Pittsburgh are fired up about Penn State teams playing in their backyard.

"I think people are excited about it, especially in this region," said Franklin. "We are playing in '16, '17, '18 and '19...There is a lot of history and tradition with it. Generally, I'm in support of keeping the dollars in the state and supporting high school football and programs in the state. And in a lot of ways, there are some really good arguments you could make why it makes sense."

The Nittany Lions and Panthers last met inside Three Rivers Stadium in 2000. The series is slated for four-straight seasons, but Franklin indicated in the press conference prior to the event that both sides are open to discussions about the potential for more games in the future.

As for the hockey program, since Penn State has been a Division I program, the Lions have played in Pittsburgh each season. Every game has been well attended by Nittany Nation. Home to 56,000 alums in the greater metro area, the Steel City is home to some of Penn State's most loyal followers.

With the conclusion of a superb event in the Pittsburgh area, the first leg of the Coaches Caravan is wrapped up. The circuit will pick back up on May 19 in Philadelphia. A big thank you goes out to the fans who attended all six stops during week one.

"That's what these caravans are all about and that's what makes this so special," Franklin said. "We don't get to do this often, and we just want you to know how truly important you are to what we do...The thing that will always make Penn State special is the people."
    

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VIDEO: Pittsburgh Press Conference Video


Miles Traveled:
Day 1 - 129 miles

Day II - 142 miles
Day III - 444 miles

Caravan Total - 715 miles


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Follow GoPSUsports.com's Tony Mancuso on Twitter @GoPSUTony

2015 Coaches Caravan Day II - Washington, D.C. & Baltimore

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Photo Gallery - Washington, D.C. | Photo Gallery - Baltimore

Day I Recap - Harrisburg & Lancaster

BALTIMORE - The Coaches Caravan traveled southeast on Wednesday on day two of the first leg, making a pair of stops in Washington, D.C., and Baltimore.

The Penn State wrapped Fullington Trailways bus rolled into the nation's capital on Wednesday morning for a lunch stop to kick off the day. Take a look through highlights from the second two stops of a six-event week on the Coaches Caravan.

Stop No. 3 - Washington, D.C. (JW Marriott)
Raised in Annapolis, Maryland, Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour kicked off the panel of speakers with a story about how she was introduced to the prideful fan base of the Nittany Lions. The D.C. area is home to approximately 26,000 Penn State alums. Barbour cited that many of the folks sitting in the room played a big role in establishing her feelings about the University.

"You all taught me about Penn State," said Barbour. "Growing up in the area, I learned a lot of my initial feelings and in a lot of ways had my introduction to Penn State from people like you."

Each year on the Caravan, the trips to the DMV are always filled with enthusiastic fans of the Blue and White. And it's a critical area for recruiting.

"This is going to be a very, very important area for us moving forward in recruiting," head coach James Franklin said. "It's always been a big part of Penn State Football, and it will continue to be very important."

Additionally, with the expanded footprint of the Big Ten Conference, the Penn State fans in the DC area will have more opportunities to see the Lions play closer to home.

In addition to games at Maryland across all of the Big Ten's sanctioned sports, the 2017 Big Ten Basketball Tournament will be contested in Washington, D.C., from March 8-12 in the Verizon Center.

Among the attendees in D.C. on Wednesday was captain in the U.S. Navy. Looking at the diehard Penn State fan, hockey head coach Guy Gadowsky singled the man out during his speech about the Nittany Lion supporters. Gadowsky said the Navy captain came up to him prior to the lunch to inform him of a new tradition started during the Michigan hockey series. The captain brought tailgating to the parking lot during the coldest weekend of the year, and Gadowsky loved it.

"How are you not fired up to play in Pegula Ice Arena when you have someone like a Navy captain tailgating outside in the snow before our game?" Gadowsky said.

What gives the Caravan a unique touch are stories and meetings like the one Gadowsky had with the Naval captain. Penn State's fan base is one big family. Each coach on the Caravan uses the experience to learn about the fans and engage with them. It helps the fans understand how important the support is for each program on campus.

"Our philosophy is built on relationships and how we interact with people," head coach James Franklin said.

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VIDEO: Washington, D.C. Press Conference




Stop No. 4 - Baltimore (Hilton Baltimore BWI Airport)
After a quick look at the White House before leaving Washington, the Caravan traveled north to Baltimore for stop No. 4 during the week at the Hilton near BWI Airport. The greater Baltimore area is home to nearly 10,500 Penn State alums, and like Washington, the Caravan crowd is always energetic at stops in the DMV. Wednesday evening's event was no different.

Barbour, and head coaches James Franklin, Guy Gadowsky and Denise St. Pierre received a rousing ovation from the moment they stepped on the stage inside Thurgood Marshall Ballroom.

It's going to be a big year ahead for Penn State and the Baltimore area. The Nittany Lions are slated to meet Maryland on October 24 in M&T Bank Stadium. The game will mark Penn State's first game in Baltimore since Nov. 9, 1991 when the Lions topped Maryland, 47-7, in Memorial Stadium.

The DMV is home to 19 players on the 2015 football roster. That list includes seven returning players who hail from the state of Maryland. For decades, the Baltimore-Washington, D.C., area has been pivotal recruiting ground for the football program. That is not going to change in the eyes of Coach Franklin.

caravan15_baltimore_1.jpg Assistant coaches Charles Huff and Sean Spencer were in attendance on Wednesday evening after spending the day recruiting in the area. Additionally, junior offensive lineman Brian Gaia (Pasadena, Maryland) was in attendance. Gaia stood and recited the program's four core values when called upon during Franklin's speech.

Maryland is an area Franklin and Gadowsky are quite familiar with. They both have family members in the state. And Franklin spent several years of his professional career in the local area.

"Being able to come around to different areas around the region is great, and we love to come out and say thank you," Franklin said. "The fans have been so supportive since we got here last year, and places like this are big reason we have felt so welcome."

An Annapolis native, Barbour spoke on Wednesday evening about having the opportunity to come home when she took the job as Director of Athletics for Penn State in August. Her passion for the Blue and White is evident every time she speaks. Barbour loves every ounce of her job and takes great pride in leading a department that sets the standard for academic and athletic excellence.

"All of the reasons why I came to Penn State have all come true and more," Barbour said.

The first week of the Caravan will conclude on Thursday with stops in Altoona (lunch) and north of Pittsburgh (evening reception).

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VIDEO: Baltimore Press Conference



Coaches Caravan Miles Traveled:
Day I - 129 miles
Day II - 142 miles

Caravan Total - 271 miles

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Follow GoPSUsports.com's Tony Mancuso on Twitter @GoPSUTony


2015 Coaches Caravan Day I - Harrisburg and Lancaster

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Photo Gallery: Stop #1 - Harrisburg | Photo Gallery: Stop #2 - Lancaster

LANCASTER, Pa. - The 2015 Penn State Coaches Caravan hit the road on Tuesday with a pair of events in the heart of Nittany Lion country at Harrisburg and Lancaster.

The Penn State themed Fullington Trailways bus pulled out of the Bryce Jordan Center parking lot at 7:04 a.m. en route to Harrisburg. Take a look through highlights from the first two stops of a six-event week on the Coaches Caravan.

Stop No. 1 - Harrisburg (Best Western Premier)
Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour and head coaches James Franklin, Guy Gadowsky and Denise St. Pierre headlined the first day of the road tour on Tuesday. The trip began with a visit to the Pennsylvania State Capitol Building. Members of the travel party toured the ornate structure, which was built in 1906 at a cost of $15 million.

Just after 10 a.m., Barbour, the head coaches and Penn State Alumni Association Executive Director Roger Williams participated in the opening of the Pennsylvania House of Representatives session for May 5. Representative Frank Farry introduced Franklin before the head coach of the Nittany Lions addressed the room of state representatives. Farry, who hails from Bucks County, and Franklin both graduated from Neshaminy High School.

"I can't tell you how honored we are to be here and address the House of Representatives," said Franklin.

blog_harrisburg15_2.jpg VIDEO - Courtesy of Representative Farry


 From the Capitol Building, the bus traveled to the Best Western Premier for the opening stop of the two-week tour through the region. Barbour spoke to the crowd first, highlighting the department's "why" and her vision for Penn State Intercollegiate Athletics. Everything within the department begins with the "why", and the student-athletes are at the forefront.

"We want to create a world class environment for our student-athletes to help them prepare for life after earning their degrees," Barbour said.

While it is mentioned regularly, the support Penn State fans provide for the athletic department and its 800 student-athletes is something that should never be taken for granted. And Barbour, along with the coaches, would like to use the Coaches Caravan as an opportunity to simply say thank you for the fans' unrivaled commitment.

"The fact that so many people are here with us (today) is tremendous," said St. Pierre. "The fact that all of you stuck with us makes us feel so fortunate."

"One of the best things about this for me is getting to learn from these other coaches," Gadowsky said. "The second thing that I love about this is getting to be around people who share the same amount of passion as you."

Gadowsky's remarks were a transition into a comical story about a fan's commitment to the hockey program. One of the approximately 250 fans in attendance on Tuesday for lunch had been struck while attempting to catch a puck during a Penn State men's hockey game this winter. He met Gadowsky before the program began and showed him some of his battle scars. As the crowd roared with approval, the man pulled the puck from his pocket and waved to the fans while Gadowsky applauded him for sticking with the game and not leaving despite black eyes and a bloody face.

"This is the type of guy I want at our hockey games. He didn't leave!" Gadowsky said.

Franklin promptly asked the fan if he had any eligibility left because he wants that type of commitment within the football program. The second-year leader of the Nittany Lions then highlighted the program's stellar academic success in 2014-'15. Fifty-seven players achieved a 3.0 GPA or higher during the fall semester. Additionally, 21 true freshman earned a 3.0 GPA or better in the fall. Graduation and success in the classroom will always be at the top of Franklin's list of accomplishments for the growth of the football program.

Emphasizing the program's four core values is a staple for Franklin moving forward. He told the crowd that the players and staff members did a good job of memorizing the values - positive attitude, unrivaled work ethic, compete in everything you do and sacrifice - but now he wants to see the program live them.

With five more days on the caravan ahead, the theme of each discussion will focus on what makes Penn State so special - the people.

"I love to take this time to say thank you," Franklin said. Having the opportunity to come out and thank you personally means a lot to me."


VIDEO: Harrisburg Press Conference



Stop No. 2 - Lancaster (Marriott at Penn Square)

More than 360 boisterous Penn State fans greeted the Coaches Caravan in Lancaster on Tuesday night. The crowd was enthusiastic from the moment Roger Williams, Executive Director of the Penn State Alumni Association, welcomed the group with a rousing "We Are" chant in the Commonwealth Ballroom of the Marriott at Penn Square.

Barbour, Franklin, Gadowsky and St. Pierre were joined during the pre-event reception by assistant football coaches John Donovan and Brent Pry, who were in the area recruiting on Tuesday. Donovan and Pry, along with the rest of the assistant coaches have been on the recruiting trail since spring practice wrapped up with the Blue-White Game.

Like the first stop in Harrisburg, Barbour opened the evening with a speech updating the fans and alums in the room about the current state of Penn State Athletics. With 500 of the 800 student-athletes receiving a 3.0 GPA or higher, the department's academic excellence speaks for itself.

Additionally, on the field, it has been a stellar campaign for Penn State teams, as well. Currently sitting in second spot in the Learfield Directors' Cup following the winter season, Penn State had 15 of its 17 teams (through the winter seasons) NCAA postseason competition. That list includes four teams that won conference titles, a record seventh NCAA title for women's volleyball and three individual NCAA championships.
    

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It's no surprise to see the academic and athletic accolades when you hear the coaches speak to the public. Franklin, Gadowsky and St. Pierre are just three examples of what is a tremendous lineup of coaches on the University Park campus right now.

"I continue to listen to the gratitude and passion from our coaches towards their student-athletes, and it's just so impressive," Barbour said.

The success of Penn State's teams on the field and in the classroom would not be possible without superb mentors, and it would not be possible without the support of individuals like those in the room on Tuesday night in Lancaster.

"No one in the nation does passion like we do, and it's not even close," Gadowsky said. "Not only is it fun to be a part of a family reunion (home game), it's very motivating for us."

The sense of pride in Penn State Blue and White is truly unique.

"There is no place like us," Franklin said.

The Caravan will extend outside of Pennsylvania on Wednesday when it rolls south to Washington, D.C., and Baltimore.
    

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VIDEO: Lancaster Press Conference




Miles Traveled:
Day 1 - 129 miles


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Nittany Lions Coach Kids During Garth Brooks ProClinic

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By Julie Bacanskas, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Saturday afternoon, members of the Penn State men's and women's ice hockey teams spent time inside Pegula Ice Arena. They were not practicing, not skating, not working on their own skills. Instead, they were serving as coaches, teaching 50 kids from the Centre County Youth Services Bureau and YMCA of Centre County about the sport of hockey with the Garth Brooks Teammates for Kids Foundation.

When most people think of Garth Brooks, they automatically register his successful singing career; however in 1999, Brooks and one other created Teammates for Kids, a foundation aiming to give all kids an even start. They wanted to use statistics in sports, transforming them into dollars that could directly impact children across the world. That is exactly what the foundation has done.

"We started with baseball, Major League Baseball," Brooks said. "I think we had about 60 players the first year, and what it was is a player donates money for homeruns or here goals, saves, assists, stuff like that. Then our job is to triple that money as a foundation. One hundred percent of the money goes to kids. That's it. Every penny goes to kids. We walk into a locker room now with 4,000 professional athletes, and the first thing you say is 100 percent of the money goes to kids. They just start signing left and right. So, it's pretty cool."

With Brooks' current tour making a stop in State College, he knew he wanted to host a camp at Penn State. It was immediately clear that hockey was the way to go. With the ice removed from the main rink at Pegula, it was the perfect setting for a floor hockey clinic. Both the men's team and the women's team were excited to get involved.

The kids in attendance were split into groups by age, and each athlete was given one specific group to coach. The experience was something special for not only the kids but also the Nittany Lions.

"I have the older kids, and they've been just this happy group," said women's hockey junior Jordin Pardoski. "They're so happy to be here. They're having a blast out there, so it's really fun."

Nevertheless, this clinic is not only helping the children involved. It is also assisting the game of hockey as many new faces are being exposed to the sport through the clinic.

"I think the biggest thing for me is I just want to try and share the game," said men's hockey forward Eric Scheid. "Hockey is growing, but it's still not there yet, especially college hockey. So, out of all the kids here today if one or two of them grows a love for the game, then I think today was a success. I just want to spread the game and my love for it. I hope someone get to enjoy the game like I do."

As the 50 kids ran around with sticks in their hands, the enjoyment was written all over their faces. They smiled wide and were constantly talking with their coaches. It didn't matter that many didn't know who Garth Brooks was because that they were having fun and enjoying every minute of the experience.

Clinics like these and sports in general have so much to offer children, allowing them to grow. They promote health, promote friendship, promote positivity, and when working with the kids of Centre County, those aspect are exactly what the coaches emphasized.

"Another thing sport does is it creates bonds and friendships that last a lifetime," Scheid said. "I've been on a lot of different teams in the last five or six years, played with a lot of different players. Every year you play on a team and meet 20 new teammates, and you make friends for life."

Overall, Brooks wants to encourage these kids to be happy, to be healthy and to enjoy life. Hosting these camps is truly making a huge impact on many lives, which is why the country singer continues to have them.

Sports offer children so much in the grand scheme of life. It is of the utmost importance to continue that trend and to allow kids to grow into positive people.

"Hopefully what we teach them is to believe in themselves, to love one another," said Brooks. "And, if it's through the sport of hockey or through the sport of life, if today changes one of those kids to look in the mirror and feel better about themselves then this whole camp, this whole tour, everything is worth it."
    

Nittany Lions Look Back on First Winning Season

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By Julie Bacanskas, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - With the 2014-15 Penn State men's hockey season now in the books, the team has a number of accomplishments it can be proud of. In a year the team thought may be free of program firsts, the Nittany Lions certainly had their fair share of new, historical experiences.

The team secured its first winning season, its first national ranking, its first season sweep over a team. The Blue and White downed all of its conference opponents at least once this year, defeated a top-five team and even had two Hobey Baker Award Nominees in Taylor Holstrom and Casey Bailey.

With such monumental achievements throughout the season, it is clear that the future of Penn State hockey is extremely bright. This program will only continue to grow.

"I like the direction we're going," head coach Guy Gadowsky said. "I think we improved a whole lot last year. I think we improved this year, and I'm optimistic it will continue."

With only eight total wins and three conference victories in 2013-14, the Nittany Lions entered this season expected to finish last in the Big Ten. However, they were ready to prove everyone wrong.

They ended this season 18-15-4, which is more than double the win total Penn State had last year. Furthermore, the team went 10-9-1 in the conference, finishing out the regular season in fourth place and staying in contention for the regular season title until its final weekend series.

Maybe the most talked about aspect of this year's squad was its ability to shoot the puck. The team averaged 39.2 shots per game; however, there were numerous games when it racked up over 50 attempts.

While shooting may have become a major part of Penn State's identity, the Nittany Lions are still in the process of building the program.

"You're never quite done," said Gadowsky. "When will we have the identity that they know what we're all about? I think we're getting there. I don't think we're there yet, but we're getting there."

Unlike last season, Penn State will not return almost its entire roster. Seven seniors, including captain Patrick Koudys, assistant captain Nate Jensen, Jacob Friedman, Max Gardiner, PJ Musico and Peter Sweetland, will all graduate. Additionally, the team will lose its leading scorer in Bailey, who decided to move on to the next stage in his career with the Toronto Maple Leafs.

These leaders will not be easy for the Nittany Lions to replace, but Penn State still has a number of players key to its identity. People such as David Goodwin and Eric Scheid will be heavily relied upon up front, as will the emerging Scott Conway, while defensemen Luke Juha and Connor Varley will need to secure the blueline.

Even with eight players leaving, the Nittany Lions will still find success come October 2015.

"This is our third year," said Gadowsky. "Everybody that signed up to come on knows that they're going to be relied upon. That's maybe part of the attractiveness to come in. So, if they're going to take full advantage of the opportunity that's been given to them, they know that they're going to have to come in in very good shape because they are going to get the opportunity to contribute at a very high level right off the hop."

This season was certainly a major stepping-stone for a young, emerging program. Success is in the cards for Penn State hockey.

"Hopefully what's next is that we'll continue to cultivate and elevate our culture in terms of work ethic and commitment, what we control," Gadowsky said. "We're not necessarily put our minds set to one specific thing. We have a lot of ideas in our head, fantasies in our head with what is going to happen with this program, and we look forward to all of them. But, we're not picking what's going to happen next. We're just going to continue to build our culture and continue to add on to our foundation, and good things are going to happen."

Casey Bailey: The First Nittany Lion to Sign an NHL Contract

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By Julie Bacanskas, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - As the Penn State men's ice hockey team suited up for its first Division I game in 2012, Casey Bailey was preparing for his first collegiate game. Nevertheless, a lack of experience wouldn't stop the forward from succeeding, and in the second period, the then-freshman scored the first goal in the program's NCAA history.

That day, Bailey etched his name into the Nittany Lions' history book. The forward, however, wasn't finished making history, as he became the program's first player to sign a National Hockey League contract this weekend.

Casey Bailey is now a Toronto Maple Leaf.

"It's an honor," Bailey said of joining the NHL. "I kind of had that in the back of my head coming to this school that that might be a possibility. It's always been a dream of mine to make the NHL, and now that it's all coming to life, it's pretty surreal. It hasn't really hit me yet. I'm excited to get out there."

Bailey is coming off his most successful season with the Nittany Lions. He notched a team-leading 22 goals and 40 points, went plus-11, was a Hobey Baker Award Candidate and was named to the All-Big Ten First team.

His skill had not gone unnoticed by numerous NHL teams and scouts throughout the year. But, when it came time to make a final decision on which team he would sign with, the forward knew Toronto would provide him with the best opportunities.

Now, Bailey is ready to take his play to the next level with one of hockey's oldest organizations.

"I saw an opportunity there to start my NHL career," he said regarding Toronto. "I had a nice chat with Brendan Shanahan, and I liked what he was saying about what they have coming in the future and what he saw in me as a player and it's similarities to how I see myself as a player. So, going from there, it's an Original Six. It's Toronto. It's awesome. I'm so honored and excited for the opportunity."

Even with Bailey's success at Penn State, he knows he will need to step up and put in a new level of dedication and effort to his training. He's hungry for this experience.

"Wherever they put me, wherever they can need me, I'm there to learn," Bailey said. "I'm there to learn. It's going to be a great group of guys. It's going to be a huge learning experience for me to see what I need to do this summer to prepare. So, wherever they need me, they put me, I'll be grateful."

Choosing to sign with the Maple Leafs means the forward will forgo his senior year at Penn State. The decision was bitter sweet as it means he will not have one final year to play as a Nittany Lion.

Bailey will miss the weekend games in Pegula, the students and the support. However, most of all, he will miss the team, the guys who were willing to join a program that was slated to consistently lose.

Together, he and his teammates defied the odds and have already created a solid foundation for Penn State hockey. They've built a program.

"I have a great bond with, you know I had a class of ten plus guys with me, and just those guys and the seniors leaving this year and even the sophomores that have come in," said Bailey. "Just the guys and Pegula and the fan base and just the student body. I bleed Blue and White, and I plan to come back and finish my degree at some point. I'll definitely probably miss the guys the most."

Bailey leaves the program as the all-time leader in goals with 45, as well as in points with 80. He has left his mark on this program, loving every minute of the time he represented Penn State on the ice.

"It's incredible," he said of the university. "I mean the support the school and everybody has behind the hockey program, it's just going to keep rising. I hope I can stay a part of it in some way, and I hope that I left a good impression on everybody."
 

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