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By Mike Gilbert, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Jenny Rizzo started the day out like most other freshmen at Penn State; she went to class.  But she ended her Friday in a way not many students are capable of, by leading her field hockey team to its first victory of the season.

 

As a true freshman, starting at goalie can be an intimidating task.  But Rizzo was poised all night, making three clutch saves and holding Temple to a shutout to capture the win.

 

"You get into the zone when you get out here," said the freshman from Hershey, PA. 

 

"I'm nervous before I put my pads on but once they're on, it's game time."

 

Rizzo did not look nervous tonight, even as Temple got off 11 shots.  Rizzo made a beautiful save on a high-lofting shot midway through the second half, reaching up with her glove and tapping it away from the goal. 

 

The freshman's talent is certainly why she was able to come in and start in net in her first season.  But the way the team interacts and includes the freshmen has a big part in their early success.  And the freshmen are certainly having success early on in the year.

 

"We have a [pregame] dance party in the locker room," Rizzo said with a laugh.

 

"We just kind of put on some pump up music and it's a good bonding experience and gets the freshmen involved," she continued.

 

The other freshman having tremendous early season success is Katie Dembrowski, who knocked in the first goal of the game early on that set the tone for the night. 

 

"Before the game we just jam to music, everyone goes in and does a dance move, it's a lot of fun," said Dembrowski who scored her first goal as a Nittany Lion Friday.

 

So does pregame dancing fuel the team to wins?  Maybe.  But it might have more to do with the sense of inclusion for the freshmen and how they are welcomed with open arms by teammates and coaches. 

 

Rizzo got some lunch after class, eating only what the coaching staff deems ok to eat for peak performance, and came to the locker room early to get ready and warm up with the other goalkeepers.  Then coach Morett-Curtiss had some words for the team.

 

"Coach will just talk to us and get us hype for the game," said Rizzo.

 

Morett-Curtiss had some praise about her goalie after the game.

 

"I thought that she was calm, I thought that she was just on her angles which is really important...She was right behind the defense which is what we want."

 

Penn State controlled the tempo of the game, and seemed to be on offense the majority of the time.  The team scored twice on 18 shots, including Dembrowski's early goal and a goal with 8:38 remaining in the first half by Brooke Birosik.  The Lions also had five penalty corners. 

 

The win was a major relief for many of the players, as now they can focus on simply playing, not getting their first win of the season.

 

"Especially having [the game] on our home turf, there's definitely a monkey off our backs.  It's really special," Birosik said after the contest.

 

Much of the win had to do with the levelheaded play of the team's true freshman goalie.  

Lucky 33 for the Lions

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By Mike Gilbert, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Jersey numbers always have a certain element of superstition and lore to athletes.  The numbers on athlete's backs provide comfort, familiarity or serve as a reminder of past success.  For three members of the field hockey squad during fall practice, that number is 33. 

 

Associate Head Coach Lisa Bervinchak-Love, entering her 22nd season coaching the team, is all too familiar with the number 33.

 

"Thirty-three was my dad's number in high school and it's just a great number, Larry Bird [wore 33]," said the former 1988 co-captain.

 

"It's exciting to see the number 33 because you don't see it much anymore.  It's not as popular in field hockey where the numbers are usually lower, said Bervinchak-Love.

 

After Bervinchak-Love, Stacy Gilberg and Amanda Eckert were both among those to wear the number.

Gilberg and Eckert were both All-Americans. Bervinchak-Love is an All-American and Pennsylvania State Hall of Famer.  Is the success of players wearing number 33 still a coincidence?   

"High standards out here, that's my number," she said only half-jokingly. 

 

Amanda Dinunzio had a decorated career as a Nittany Lion, earning NFHCA Division I All-Mideast First Team in her senior season.  She is looking forward to playing in Rotterdam, a city in South Holland for the upcoming fall and spring seasons.  Dinunzio also told GoPSUSports.com that she is planning on doing something big in the future.

 

"It's a great opportunity I was given to join the club there and then I'm going to look to maybe do other things like try out for the U.S. National team," Dinunzio said.

 

So, how did a potential Team U.S.A. player start her journey that took her through State College?  She started with the number 33. 

 

"My sister had that number in high school and she got me into the game of field hockey," explained Dinunzio.

 

"She was always someone I looked up to," she continued. 

 

Dinuzio served as a grad assistant until last week, when she left to pursue her opportunities in the Netherlands.  Now, a freshman is looking to carry on the legacy of the number 33. 

 

The number will live on through highly recruited freshman Katie Dembrowski and coach Bervinchak-Love is excited to see what she can do.

 

"She has speed and great vision," said the coach who cares about the number that used to belong to her but more about wins.

 

Dembrowski, from Palmyra, Pa., is the next Lion to wear the number, and she sees herself as a similar player to the three-time Academic All-Big Ten player, Dinunzio. 

 

"It's pretty cool [following Amanda], because she was a really fast player and speed is something that is a big part of my game, so it's cool to be following her with her number," said the District 3-AA high school champion. 

 

Dembrowski is used to the number three, but since Grace Nissi is donning that number this fall, she resorted to the familiar 33.

 

"Three has always been my favorite number, but since that wasn't available I picked 33 because it had a three in it and on my old indoor team I used to be number 33," explained Dembrowski. 

 

Dembrowski started the first two games of the year as a true freshman, so the number 33 appears to be in good hands after the transition. 

 

The Lions had a tough opening weekend in Virginia, dropping back-to-back games against Old Dominion and Virginia. The Old Dominion game was a 2-1 loss, while the UVA game was lost in overtime.  Penn State had a last second chance against the Lady Monarchs until keeper Kelly Weaver made a great save with a few seconds left to preserve the victory for her team.

 

In Charlottesville, the Blue and White led 3-2 in the second half, coming back from a two-goal deficit as Stephanie Hussey scored the team's go-ahead goal in the second half.  In overtime, Virginia scored almost three minutes into the period, claiming the heartbreaking victory. 

 

Penn State looks to bounce back over the weekend, as Temple comes to town Friday, followed by a trip to Lewisburg to take on Bucknell Sunday afternoon.     

 


 

 

By Mike Gilbert, GoPSUsports.com Student Staff Writer
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - When a former captain of the Nittany Lions' football team has something to say about teamwork and winning, it's best to listen.  That is why Head Coach Charlene Morett-Curtiss was thrilled when the Penn State standout turned motivational speaker Lee Rubin was able to talk to her team.

"He was clear and concise and gave us some great takeaways, including the five components of success for an extraordinary team," said Morett-Curtiss during Tuesday's media day at the Bryce Jordan Center.

Lee was dropping his daughter off at Penn State, and the head coach entering her 29th year seized the moment.  Coming off an NCAA quarterfinal appearance a year ago, the squad sat down and listened to the former star defensive back.

Rubin, who played in three bowl games in three seasons while roaming the defensive backfield, listed the five "C's" of success in athletics.  The first "C" is competing, and as coach Morett-Curtiss was explaining what that meant outside the green room, both her and senior Haley Kerstetter looked at each other and said "loving to win and hating to lose" in unison, with smiles on their faces. 

The second "C" stood for common goal, and the third was communicating on and off the field. 

"That's something very important to this team, especially building team chemistry off the field," Kerstetter said. 

The fifth "C" was consistency, and as the word came out of Morett-Curtiss's mouth, her smile dissipated, her eyes became locked in, and she went into full-on coach mode. 

"We have to be consistent during every rep in every practice," said the fifth all-time win leader in Division I history. 

Clearly, as the head coach believes and Lee Rubin reinforced, consistency and good reps in practice are the keys to success this season.

As for the offseason practices so far, Morett-Curtiss mentioned connecting better on possession passes during the scrimmage against Drexel as something that needs improvement.  In addition, the defense will need a little more of a spark, but it is much too early to worry about that.    

"I think our challenge right now is to get our defense to play as a unit," said Morett-Curtiss.

With so many new faces vying for spots, it will take a little time in order for the team to gel.  Losing eight starters from a year ago will challenge any team's resiliency and ability to come together.  With that being said, the team is still ranked at No. 7 in the preseason polls and expectations are high.

There are still key players on this team that can provide leadership.  Carly Celkos can play middie and back this season and has been named to the B1G Players to Watch List.  Cori Conley and Stephanie Hussey also made the list, and Morett-Curtiss announced Hussey will play center striker this season.

The team heads to Virginia to start the season, playing at Old Dominion on Friday, then will travel to Charlottesville to face off against Virginia, a team coming off a disappointing season.  The Blue and White will then come home to play Temple on September 4th.   

"It's refreshing and exciting to see what they can do," said the coach about her new-look 2015-16 team.

Time to see what the hype is all about. 

VIDEO: 2015 Season Preview - Field Hockey

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - The Nittany Lion field hockey team begins its fall season on Friday with a trip to Old Dominion (6 p.m.). The Lions will cap off the opening weekend with a contest at Virginia on Sunday (12 p.m.).

After qualifying for the NCAA Tournament for 30th time in 33 seasons in 2014, Penn State heads into the season with a number of new faces.

GoPSUsports.com paid a visit to pre-season practice to talk with head coach Charlene Morett-Curtiss, junior Kirsten Gochnauer and sophomore Emily Bruggemeier. Take a look.





Follow GoPSUsports.com's Tony Mancuso on Twitter @GoPSUTony

VIDEO: 2014-15 Year in Review with Sandy Barbour

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - GoPSUsports.com talks with Director of Athletics Sandy Barbour to review a superb 2014-15 season for Penn State Athletics.





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VIDEO: 2014-15 Season Highlights

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Penn State's 2014-15 season was one marked by excellence on the field, in the classroom and in the community. GoPSUsports.com takes a look back at the campaign in a season highlight reel.


Commemorating 25 Years of Penn State and the Big Ten

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Penn State has won 92 Big Ten titles, including 21 in women's soccer (16 regular season).



By Tony Mancuso
UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Just four months into his tenure as commissioner of the Big Ten Conference, Jim Delany recalls an idea brought to the table by former Illinois President Stan Ikenberry.

It was October of 1989 when Ikenberry, who spent time as a senior administrator at Penn State earlier in his career, broached the thought of adding an institution to the Big Ten for the first time since Michigan State was invited to become a member in 1949.

The Big Ten then began a formal research process of an institution that would bridge a Midwestern league to the East.

The Pennsylvania State University was on the table for discussion as a superb academic institution with a rich tradition in athletic success.

Delany, whose sister attended Penn State as a graduate student, didn't need much convincing. He knew the level of potential a partnership between Penn State and the Big Ten could foster.

"The Big Ten hadn't changed in many, many decades, but I thought if the opportunity to expand presented itself it was a no brainer," Delany said earlier this week. "Excellent academics. Excellent athletics. And pointed towards the East Coast, I thought there was a lot of potential there. That was my recommendation at the time."

The process moved forward with the presidents and chancellors of the Big Ten institutions discussing the topic before news broke just before the holidays in December of 1989 that Penn State could be on its way into a new conference. Under the direction of athletic director Jim Tarman at the time, Penn State had been competing as an independent in football for more than a century, and the rest of the department had been a member of the Atlantic 10 since 1976.

When the news initially surfaced, women's volleyball head coach Russ Rose, who along with field hockey coach Charlene Morett-Curtiss are the two current Penn State head coaches who were on staff in 1989, was giving a presentation at the annual women's volleyball coaches convention (AVCA) about the importance of NCAA Tournament at-large bids for teams in smaller conferences.

"I remember talking in front of the group about the importance that not all of the at-large bids go to the bigger conferences and that there were good teams in other conferences even though they didn't have the same notoriety, said Rose. "We have a lunch break. I turn on ESPN at lunch, and I see that Penn State is going to be a member of the Big Ten. I come back. I say to some people that I would like to retract what I said about at-large teams."

The formal process concluded with a vote in Iowa City on June 4, 1990, at which time Penn State was officially accepted as a member of the Big Ten Conference. Twenty-five years have passed in a partnership that allowed both the University and conference to reach unprecedented heights on the field and in the classroom.

"From a broad perspective, at the time, my view was that it was a tremendous fit for both sides. And history has proven that," Delany said. "With all the other expansions around the country, I'm not sure there was one that benefitted both institution and conference as much as this did, largely because of the characteristics of Penn State were so well matched with the characteristics of the Big Ten."

The positive news zipped throughout campus shortly after the vote in Iowa.

"I remember hearing about the announcement from Mary Jo Haverbeck, from the Sports Information office," said Morett-Curtiss. "She told me about us going in and how it was going to have a major impact for women's athletics at Penn State."

It was an announcement that changed the landscape of funding and development for all of Penn State's 28 programs at the time, and it was a day Morett-Curtiss remembers quite well.

"Ironically, I had gone for a run that day on the trails near Sunset Park and as I'm running, I see someone walking in front of me and it was Joe Paterno," Morett-Curtiss said. "And it was that day, so I said to him, 'hey what's going to happen?' He said, 'I think this is going to be a really good thing for Penn State and the exposure all of the programs are going to get.'"

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The women's volleyball program captured Penn State's first Big Ten title in 1992, marking volleyball's first of 16 conference crowns.

 
Penn State's teams felt the impact of the Big Ten conference almost immediately.

"What it did for us when we joined the Big Ten is that it No. 1 it resulted in a reassessment of the levels of commitment we had to the various programs," Rose said. "We became fully funded when we joined the Big Ten. Prior to that, we were not fully funded. And we were not fully staffed. Entering Big Ten, collectively, for all of the sports resulted in us having a new commitment from the University to try and be competitive. From a volleyball perspective, we had been competitive prior to that, but playing in the Big Ten in women's volleyball made us better because the level of competition was better than we were experiencing in the Atlantic 10."

At the time, women's volleyball had just one assistant coach on the staff alongside Rose and nine scholarships to field a roster. Joining the Big Ten boosted the program to full funding and 12 scholarships.

"As I look at it now, we could have had some great teams if we had funding in the early years," said Rose. "That was just the way that it was.  When you take a job, that is the job you took. When we joined the Big Ten, a lot of us got a better job without having to move. But it's way more competitive. Recruiting is a lot different than what we had experienced in the Atlantic 10."

The same can be said for what Morett-Curtiss experienced within the field hockey program.

"The financial support from a scholarship standpoint was huge right away," said Morett-Curtiss. "And knowing our field that we were going to build was going to be a first rate facility."

The investment for success around the Big Ten stood out during Penn State's transition. Every institution and athletic program strives to be the best. It's a trait that has not changed during the department's 25 years as a member, and it's something that will be a trademark of the Big Ten for decades to come.

"The level of commitment to being good across the conference, everybody cared," said Rose. "I don't believe every conference across the country has that sort of commitment in all of their sports. I think that is one of the things that makes the Big Ten really unique. If they offer it, they care and they want to be relevant."

Penn State's time in the Big Ten has been marked by excellence in the classroom and on the field of play. In all, Penn State's programs have accounted for 92 Big Ten championships from 15 different programs - 76 regular season and 16 post-season. Additionally, more than 170 student-athletes have accounted for nearly 300 individual Big Ten titles.

Penn State student-athletes have earned more than 5,000 Academic All-Big Ten recognitions since it joined the conference, with its three highest totals during the past three years, led by 296 in 2012-13.

"Penn State's entrance into the Big Ten not only changed the intercollegiate sports landscape, it also changed our academic landscape and our future. Our size, our academic reputation and our athletic tradition matched up well with Big Ten schools," said Penn State President Eric Barron, who also noted that all Big Ten schools are flagship universities for their states. "The academic side of the Big Ten is known as the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (CIC) and the institutions together have annual research expenditures topping $10.2 billion -- more than the Ivy League and the University of California System combined -- and they educate a total of nearly 600,000 students. The benefits from being part of such an outstanding and prestigious organization with such an expansive footprint across the nation are immeasurable."

The women's volleyball program earned Penn State's first Big Ten crown during the 1992 season, just one year after the team began competing in the league. The title marked the first of Penn State's superlative 16 Big Ten titles in women's volleyball, in addition to seven NCAA Championships since 1999.

Like women's volleyball, the women's soccer program has been a benchmark of success in conference play. The program became the department's 29th varsity sport in 1994. Since then, Penn State has won an unprecedented 16 conference titles, including a string of 15-straight from 1998-2012.

The football program claimed the Big Ten title in its second season of competition during an undefeated Rose Bowl championship campaign in 1994. Coach Joe Paterno's '94 squad became the first Big Ten team to ever post a 12-0 record. The '94 crown marked the program's first of three Big Ten championships to date (2005 and 2008).

The fall season of 2005 stands out as a monumental period in Penn State's history within the conference. Nittany Lion teams clinched five Big Ten titles in a span of 30 days. The list included field hockey, football, men's soccer, women's soccer and women's volleyball. Since the fall of 2005, Penn State teams have won 51 Big Ten championships (5.1 titles per year in a 10-year span).

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Penn State clinched five Big Ten titles in a span of 30 days during the fall of 2005, including one for the women's volleyball team.



It's impossible to quantify how the partnership between Penn State and the Big Ten altered the recruiting landscape for the teams on campus and how the recruiting gains equated to success on the field of play. But pitching a world-renowned education with an elite conference affiliation cultivated relationships with premier student-athletes.

"The name recognition was big for football, but when you see how many of the Universities and programs have been successful on a national level, I think that has greatly helped," Morett-Curtiss. "Exposure for all of the Universities within the conference has helped us all grow. Combining the academic side of what these Universities have with the athletics, it's a very powerful combination when we go out recruiting student-athletes."

A big piece to the exposure of Penn State teams during the past 25 years was the launch of the Big Ten Network on Aug. 30, 2007. More than 800 Penn State sporting events have aired live on the BTN since it launched. The benefits of the conference's TV network, which is in more than 60 million homes,  increased visibility across the country for the department in a way that cannot be measured.

"The Network was a major step for us," Morett-Curtiss. "Just having the opportunity to have games on TV so that little girls can watch and learn about the sport. It's helped, not only exposure for the program, but it's helped the sport grow. It's just a phenomenal avenue for us to showcase our University and the sport."

The BTN's impact goes back to what Rose talked about as one of the immediate impacts his program felt - funding. Not only did the BTN infinitely increase exposure for Penn State teams, it has played a paramount role in increased revenues for each institution.

"Certainly, the Big Ten Network has been instrumental in generating funds for the Universities and the conference and the bowl revenue sharing has resulted in more money for all of the schools and the conference," said Rose.

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In 2008, Penn State captured its third Big Ten title in football en route to a trip to the Rose Bowl.

 

While the competitive atmosphere is intense between teams across all of the conference's sports, each member institution understands that the individual success aids in the growth of the collective conference.

"I think the relationship has been a really positive one," said Rose. "There are a lot of similarities between the various Universities."

"Everybody in the Big Ten shares what they do and why they do it; best practices," said Dave Baker, Associate Athletic Director for Business Operations. "We share lots of ideas, at least from the business manager and ticketing perspective. We learn things from one another. And there aren't secrets. We all work together and try to help each other out...We all don't do things the same way. We all have limitations, but we are all looking to help one another out for the betterment of the conference.

"Some people would find it hard to believe that people in the Big Ten root for other Big Ten teams in the postseason, but we do. We follow what is going on...It is a cooperative spirit and a partnership."

Baker is one of just a handful of Penn State administrators and coaches who have been with Intercollegiate Athletics during the past 25 years. That list includes Jan Bortner, who was head coach of the men's tennis team in 1990 and has since transitioned into a role as an associate athletic director. Among the key changes Baker felt from the business operation centered on travel. Bus trips were the norm for Penn State teams in the Atlantic 10, but the geography of the Big Ten led to more plane travel.

A quarter century has passed since initial discussions of a new relationship took place and bonds were formed. Many things have changed significantly for Penn State, the conference and intercollegiate athletics nationwide, but it's been 25 years marked by growth stemming from a vision in 1989.

"Pennsylvania is a very important state. It served as a bridge to the East for us. It made our football offerings stronger," said Delany. "It has been excellence with national championships in a variety of sports. And I have always felt that the 1994 Penn State team was the best team in the country; no disrespect to Nebraska. When you look at the players that team had (five first team All-Americans on offense) and what that group accomplished. That team was the national runner-up. That was a tremendous football team. I've seen some very good basketball teams both on the men's side and the women's side. And obviously, the wrestling and volleyball programs have been dominant on the national scene."

Penn State has won a total of 27 national championships since joining the Big Ten, including three in 2013-14, and the department's collective success speaks for itself.

By no means was the integration in 1990 an easy one, but the partnership between the University and Big Ten is a match that enabled both sides to mutually prosper in a way neither side could have envisioned when the formal vote concluded 25 years ago today.


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The wrestling team began a string of four-straight Big Ten titles in March of 2011.





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By Gabrielle RichardsGoPSUsports Student Staff Writer

UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa.- The alarm goes off at 6:00 a.m. You get dressed, pack your bag, and make your way to a 7:00 a.m. training session. You're tired, you're sore and the regular season hasn't even begun yet. This is otherwise known as the off-season. 

The off-season is meant to test you, challenge you and make you question why you love the game. That way, when you take the field during the first game, you know your purpose and take pride in putting on the jersey. Penn State field hockey's head coach, Charlene Morett-Curtiss, believes the off-season is meant for much more than morning workouts and afternoon shooting practice: it is a time to give back.

Over the course of her storied career at Penn State, Morett-Curtiss has always made it a point to get her team involved. From Penn State sponsored charities, to the Special Olympics or volunteering their time with Youth Field Hockey, this team is always lending a hand and skills to the community.

"When we recruit kids to come to Penn State, we want them to have a well rounded experience," Morett-Curtiss said. "Being apart of this program and Penn State is so much more than just playing. You have to give back to the community and support them like they support you." 

Over the past few years, there hasn't been a THON where the field hockey team wasn't present, either on the dance floor, at athlete hour, or both. This year, senior Laura Gebhart and junior Beth Mink, danced the full 46 hours and played pick-up field hockey games with the kids.

"For me, the physical and mental challenge of standing for 46 hours was a small glimpse of the fatigue these families have to go through when dealing with pediatric cancer," Gebhart said. "I am forever grateful for the interactions I had and the stories I heard.  I have so much respect for those families, and I'm happy we can help in some small way."

 "This hits home even more because Renee Messina is our team athletic trainer and as many in the field hockey family know, her daughter, Isabella had cancer very young in life," Mink said. "Knowing the type of person Renee is, I felt in my heart that I wanted to do something meaningful for their family and I know Laura felt the same. This was a once in a lifetime opportunity and I am so blessed and thankful I had the opportunity to be apart of something so breathtaking. The memories from that weekend I will hold onto forever and I will never forget all the people who helped me along the way and gave me the chance to dance in THON."

Aside from THON, the team is very active with the Special Olympics and actively participate in the Paterno Family Run every year. Even Morett-Curtiss and her coaching staff participate in the run to raise awareness and funds for Special Olympics Pennsylvania.

"It is important to us to come together as a team, as a family and participate in great events like this," Morett-Curtiss said. 

This family is one that you have for life, as the Penn State field hockey alumni have a very active and influential presence with the team. The alumni will be back in town this weekend to play in the annual Blue White Alumni Game, on April 18 at 11:30 a.m.

 

 

VIDEO: THON 2015 Pep Rally Dance - Field Hockey

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - Check out the Nittany Lions dancing on stage during the THON 2015 Pep Rally on Saturday night.




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Happy Thanksgiving from Penn State Athletics

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UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. - 'Tis the season for giving thanks, and the Penn State Athletics would like to take an opportunity to say thank you to the loyal fans on Thanksgiving.

As you sit down with family and friends to eat your traditional meal while the Lions and Cowboys host their annual Thanksgiving day home games, Penn State Athletics would like to thank you, the fans, for the unrivaled support you give every team on campus.  Penn State's teams would not be the same without the greatest fans in college sports.

As a token of their appreciation, several student-athletes from teams on campus would like to say thank you and Happy Thanksgiving for the support you give them throughout the athletic season.

@GOPSUSPORTS

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